Broken Shadows by Tarek Refaat

I’m glad to post here that my friend Tarek Refaat has finally published his new book. Last Thursday was the unvailing and it was welcomed with great enthousiasm.

I hope you will like the design of the cover title, it is one of my trials in discovering usages of the Kufi script.

Stay tuned for the work progress!

 

 

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BSCRTourButtonTitle: Broken Shadows

 

Author: Tarek Refaat

 

Release Date: April 8, 2016

 

Publisher: Red Sands Publishing

 

Genre: Thriller, Crime, Suspense, International

 

Book Description:

Broken hearts and dark shadows, will love ever find its way back to them?

Fifteen years ago, Heidi Aasar fled the country, hoping to make sense of the chaos that

surrounded her. A burned ex-operative, she refuses to continue hiding in the shadows.

She now has the chance to right the wrongs of her dark past. Determined to find a way to

redeem herself, she must first fix the loose threads she left behind so long ago.

A successful business owner, Nadim Mohamed Sharaf has done his best to move on after

his heart was broken fifteen years ago. In his mind, he has everything he could ever want

or need at his fingertips. Until the moment Heidi makes a sudden reappearance in his life.

It’s then everything around him changes.

A chain reaction of events soon turns Nadim and Heidi’s lives upside-down. Forced to

confront the turmoil brewing between them, they must put aside their differences if they

are to survive another day. The choices they’ll have to make will define the outcome of

the lives they lead.

Will they be able to overcome their painful and chaotic past? Or will the pain and

heartache consume them in the long run?

 

(Purchase links are not yet available.)

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28927401-broken-shadows

 

BSBCFULL

 

EXCERPT:

AFTER A LONG DAY AT WORK, Nadim stood in his office,

observing Cairo from the seventeen stories high window. The streets below were

crowded. He could see the people rushing to get back to their homes, eager for a little

respite from a hard day’s work.

Cabs pulled up to the curb along the two-way street to pick up clients and those eager to

get away from the ensuing chaos. People scurried about like rats trapped inside a maze.

Some greeted others in a timely fashion, while others grew surly and shouted obscenities.

Nadim smirked and shook his head. He was used to this scene spreading out before him.

It wouldn’t be long until he joined the ‘rats’ trapped in their own chaotic mazes. The

thought of making his way home appealed to him.

His mind wandered, trapping him in another maze. A maze that took him back fifteen

years. One that brought back memories he’d spent a lifetime trying to avoid. Memories

he wished he could forget, once and for all.

Nadim thought he’d forgotten all about her, the one woman who’d broken his heart.

She’d meant everything to him. He would have given her the world if she’d asked him to.

During his high school days, he’d been known as a playboy. A sweet-talker who’d gotten

exactly what he’d wanted. Charming and attentive, every girl in school came to him for

advice about guys. Most of them ended up hooking up with him.

He’d experienced the same throughout college and work until he’d met her. Beautiful and

brazen, she’d wrapped him around her finger. She’d drawn him in like a moth to flame,

inciting his baser desires. In the end, she’d played him like a smooth violin, cutting its

strings with a scalpel so that it made no noise, whatsoever.

Nadim growled with annoyance. He never thought he’d ever see her again. After fifteen

years, the bane of his existence had popped up in his life once more. Heidi had recently

dropped by his office for an interview.

 

TarekRefaatABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Tarek Refaat is an Egyptian author born in October 1980. He comes from a family that

has diverse cultural roots, and has spent most of his adulthood between Saudi and Egypt,

until finally settling in Egypt.

Tarek is an avid reader of history, and has been into writing since a very young age. He

loves to describe the thoughts and feelings he’s experienced through words. He has

written poetry and prose, and decided as of 2009 to move forward into stories and novels.

Tarek has previously been published, and has also self-published. He views writing as his

aim to reach as many people through his thoughts, and provoke positive and hopeful

energy through his stories.

SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:

Website/Blog: http://forgottenrealms.me

Twitter: https://twitter.com/energizre

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Tarek-Refaat-142437057778

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4919674.Tarek_Refaat

Email: Tarek.h.refaat@live.com

 

Quotes from “The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable”

a very nice read

I heard about it from 2 different trainers, one of them was giving us a quick course on mind mapping and the other about scenario building. So for a long time it was on my list and I finally finished it.

It can fool you as an easy read, and it is to some extent, but it has a problem of going in circles around the same idea for a long time. Nevertheless, I was rewarded every now and then with a brilliant idea, so it was ok at the end of the day.

Here are some of the words I liked:

“You need a story to displace a story. Metaphors and stories are far more potent (alas) than ideas; they are also easier to remember and more fun to read. If I have to go after what I call the narrative disciplines, my best tool is a narrative.
Ideas come and go, stories stay.”


“I noticed that very intelligent and informed persons were at no advantage over cabdrivers in their predictions, but there was a crucial difference. Cabdrivers did not believe that they understood as much as learned people—really, they were not the experts and they knew it.”


“awareness of a problem does not mean much—particularly when you have special interests and self-serving institutions in play.”


“Now, there are other themes arising from our blindness to the Black Swan:

a. We focus on preselected segments of the seen and generalize from it to the unseen: the error of confirmation.
b. We fool ourselves with stories that cater to our Platonic thirst for distinct patterns: the narrative fallacy.
c. We behave as if the Black Swan does not exist: human nature is not programmed for Black Swans.
d. What we see is not necessarily all that is there. History hides Black Swans from us and gives us a mistaken idea about the odds of these events: this is the distortion of silent evidence.
e. We “tunnel”: that is, we focus on a few well-defined sources of uncertainty, on too specific a list of Black Swans (at the expense of the others that do not easily come to mind).”



“The narrative fallacy addresses our limited ability to look at sequences of facts without weaving an explanation into them, or, equivalently, forcing a logical link, an arrow of relationship, upon them. Explanations bind facts together. They make them all the more easily remembered; they help them make more sense. Where this propensity can go wrong is when it increases our impression of understanding.”



“Our propensity to impose meaning and concepts blocks our awareness of the details making up the concept. H”



“The first problem is that information is costly to obtain.
The second problem is that information is also costly to store—like real estate in New York. The more orderly, less random, patterned, and narratized a series of words or symbols, the easier it is to store that series in one’s mind or jot it down in a book so your grandchildren can read it someday.”



“A novel, a story, a myth, or a tale, all have the same function: they spare us from the complexity of the world and shield us from its randomness”



“For me, one such antilogic came with the discovery—thanks to the literature on cognition—that, counter to what everyone believes, not theorizing is an act—that theorizing can correspond to the absence of willed activity, the “default” option. It takes considerable effort to see facts (and remember them) while withholding judgment and resisting explanations.”